Sheriff Marin County In Partnership With Our Communities
    

Frequently Asked Questions


How do I get information about someone that was arrested or in the custody at the Marin County Jail?

Contact the Marin County Jail at 415-473-7316. They can advise you if someone has been arrested, the charges, whether or not they will be released on bail, cited or released on their own recognizance and they will also provide bail amount.  You may also review the booking log of the Marin County Jail to locate individuals arrested and booked into the County of Marin jail in the last 48 hours who are still in custody, and also a complete list of inmates as of the time the search is run.

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How do I call for a deputy?

For crimes in progress or other life-threatening emergencies, call 911. For non-emergency dispatch, call
415-479-2311.

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I was away and when I came home, I found my house had been broken into. Who do I call?

Contact the Sheriff's Communications Center at 415-479-2311. If you believe someone is still in your house, leave, call 9-1-1 and wait for a deputy.

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How do I report abandoned vehicles and parking violations?

Contact the Sheriff's Communications Center at 415-479-2311.

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How do I report my car stolen?

Contact the California Highway Patrol at 415-924-1100

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How do I report non-emergency traffic concerns?

For the unincorporated areas of Marin County, contact the California Highway Patrol at 1-800-TELLCHP.

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My car was towed. How do I call to find out where it is?

Contact the Sheriff's Communications Center at 415-479-2311 (24 hours/7 days), or any law enforcement agency with access to the California Law Enforcement Telecommunications System (CLETS).

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How do I get a copy of a crime report?

For crimes reported in the unincorporated areas of Marin County you must contact the Sheriff's Records Division in person at 3501 Civic Center Drive #145, San Rafael, CA 94903. For all others, contact the responsible law enforcement agency.

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How do I find out if a Detective is working my case?

Contact the Sheriff's Investigations Division at 415-473-7265.  Ensure that you have your report number and can relate where the crime occurred.

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How do I sue someone in small claims court?

Please visit the Small Claims section of this website located within the Documentary Services Division of the Administration and Support Services Bureau.

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How do I get assistance with evictions?

Please visit the evictions section of this site located within the Documentary Services Division of the Administration and Support Services Bureau.

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How do I get legal papers served?

Please visit the Civil section of this website located within the Documentary Services Division of the Administration and Support Services Bureau.

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Why should I file a crime report?

Primarily, you need to ensure that items taken in a crime are identified as stolen property so they can be returned to you if later located. This relates to physical property, but, just as critically, account numbers and other personal identifying information may be compromised and later used in other crimes. Secondly, many law enforcement crime prevention resources are focused using crime statistics from reported crimes. Thirdly, many insurance companies will not process claims related to crimes without a valid report.

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Where can I obtain Fingerprint Live Scan services?

The Sheriff's Office conducts Fingerprint Live Scan services at 2 locations in Marin County.  For a description of the services and fees associated with livescan fingerprinting please view the Fingerprint Live Scan section of the website located within the Documentary Services Division of the Administration and Support Services Bureau.

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How do I request extra patrols in my neighborhood?

Contact the Sheriff's Communications Center for assistance in dealing with neighborhood problems, extra patrols, and vacation house checks.

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I know who stole my property... why doesn't the Sheriff's Department arrest the person right now?

Deputies arriving at a crime in progress are often able to accomplish an arrest on the spot. Except for critical situations, crimes reported after-the-fact require detailed gathering of information for investigation. Facts and evidence developed during the investigative process must be sufficient for an arrest warrant to be issued. Often, investigative workload and priorities mean that some cases are not processed as quickly as victims perceive they should be. Knowing who is assigned to your case and providing any additional discovered information is often vital to getting a case resolved.

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